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The Real Nancy Grace

How many people recall these Nancy Grace related issues? Seems like she’s conveniently swept them under the carpet…

#1: Prosecutorial misconduct:

The Supreme Court of Georgia has twice commented on Grace’s conduct as a prosecutor. First, in a 1994 heroin drug trafficking case, Bell v. State, the Court declared a mistrial, saying that Grace had “exceeded the wide latitude of closing argument” by drawing comparisons to unrelated murder and rape cases.

In 1997, the court was more severe, overturning the murder-arson conviction of businessman W. W. Carr in the death of his wife. While the court said its reversal was not due to these transgressions, since the case had turned primarily on circumstantial evidence, it nevertheless concluded “the conduct of the prosecuting attorney in this case demonstrated her disregard of the notions of due process and fairness, and was inexcusable.” Carr was freed in 2004 when The Georgia Supreme Court ruled unanimously that Fulton County had waited too long to retry him, thereby unfairly prejudicing his right to a fair trial.

Despite upholding the conviction she sought, a panel of the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals wrote in a 2005 opinion that Grace “played fast and loose” with her ethical duties and failed to “fulfill her responsibilities” as a prosecutor in the 1990 triple murder trial of Herbert Connell Stephens. The court agreed that it was “difficult to conclude that Grace did not knowingly use … [apparently false] testimony” from a detective that there were no other suspects, despite the existence of outstanding arrest warrants for other men.

#2: Suicide of interviewee Melinda Duckett:

In 2006, 21-year-old Melinda Duckett committed suicide following an interview conducted by Grace concerning the disappearance of Duckett’s 2-year-old son Trenton.

Grace interviewed Duckett less than two weeks after the child went missing, questioning her for her alleged lack of openness regarding her son’s disappearance, asking Duckett “Where were you? Why aren’t you telling us where you were that day?” Duckett appeared confused and was unable to answer whether or not she had taken a polygraph test. When Grace asked her why she could not account for specific details, Duckett began to reply, “Because I was told not to,” to which Grace responded, “Ms. Duckett, you are not telling us for a reason. What is the reason? You refuse to give even the simplest facts of where you were with your son before he went missing. It is day twelve.” According to the CNN transcript, Duckett replied, “(INAUDIBLE) with all media. It’s not just there, just all media. Period.” Grace then moved on to a media psychologist who asserted that Duckett was “skirting around the issue.”

The next day, before the airing of the show, Duckett shot herself, a death that relatives claim was influenced by media scrutiny, particularly from Grace. Speaking to The Orlando Sentinel, Duckett’s grandfather Bill Eubank said, “Nancy Grace and the others, they just bashed her to the end. She was not one anyone ever would have thought of to do something like this.” CNN has also been criticized for allowing the show to air in the wake of Duckett’s suicide. Police investigating the case had not named Melinda Duckett as a suspect in the case at the time, but after her suicide the police did say that, as nearly all parents are in missing-child cases, she was a suspect from the beginning.

In an interview on Good Morning America, Nancy Grace said in reaction to events that “If anything, I would suggest that guilt made her commit suicide. To suggest that a 15- or 20-minute interview can cause someone to commit suicide is focusing on the wrong thing.” She then said that, while she sympathized with the family, she knew from her own experience as a victim of crime that such people look for somebody else to blame.

On November 21, 2006, thesmokinggun.com exposed pending litigation on behalf of the estate of Melinda Duckett, asserting a wrongful death claim against CNN and Grace. The attorney for the estate alleges that, even if Duckett did kill her own son, Grace’s aggressive questioning traumatized Duckett so much that she committed suicide. She also argues that CNN’s decision to air the interview after Duckett’s suicide traumatized her family. Trenton was never found

#3: Duke lacrosse allegations:

Grace took a vehemently pro-prosecution position throughout the 2006 Duke University lacrosse case, in which Crystal Gail Mangum, a stripper and North Carolina Central University student, falsely accused three members of Duke University’s men’s lacrosse team of raping her at a party. Prior to Duke suspending its men’s lacrosse team’s season, she sarcastically noted on the air, “I’m so glad they didn’t miss a lacrosse game over a little thing like gang rape!” and “Why would you go to a cop in an alleged gang rape case, say, and lie and give misleading information?” After the disbarment of District Attorney Mike Nifong, Attorney General Roy Cooper pronounced all three players innocent of the rape charges made by Mangum and Nifong. On the following broadcast of her show, Grace did not appear and a substitute reporter, Jane Velez-Mitchell, announced the removal of all charges

#4: Elizabeth Smart kidnapping:

During the Elizabeth Smart case, when suspect Richard Ricci was arrested by police on the basis that he had a criminal record and had worked on the Smarts’ home, Grace immediately and repeatedly proclaimed on CourtTV and CNN’s Larry King that Ricci “was guilty,” although there was little evidence to support this claim. She also suggested publicly that Ricci’s girlfriend was involved in the cover-up of his alleged crime. Grace continued to accuse Ricci, though he died while in custody.

It was later revealed that Smart was kidnapped by Brian David Mitchell and Wanda Barzee, two individuals with whom Richard Ricci had no connection.

When CourtTV confronted Grace seven months later to ask whether she was incorrect in her assertion that Ricci was guilty, and whether or not she felt bad about it in any way, she stated that Ricci was “a known ex-con, a known felon, and brought suspicion on himself, so who could blame anyone for claiming he was the perpetrator?” When Larry King asked her about the matter, she equated criticism of herself with criticism of the police in the case. She said: “I’m not letting you take the police with me on a guilt trip

#5: Allegations regarding fiancé’s murder:

In March 2006, an article in the New York Observer suggested that in her book Objection!, Grace had embellished the story of her college fiancé’s 1979 murder and the ensuing trial to make it better support her image. Grace has described the tragedy as the impetus for her career as a prosecutor and victims’ rights advocate, and has often publicly referred to the incident. The Observer researched the murder and found several apparent contradictions between the events and Grace’s subsequent statements, including the following:

  • Her fiancé, Keith Griffin, was shot not at random by a stranger, but by a former coworker, Tommy McCoy.
  • McCoy did not have a prior criminal record and, rather than denying the crime, confessed on the night of the murder.
  • The jury deliberated for a few hours, not days.
  • There was no ongoing string of appeals (McCoy’s family did not want any). McCoy has only once filed a habeas petition, which was rejected.

Grace told the Observer she had not looked into the case in many years and “tried not to think about it.” She said she made her previous statements about the case “with the knowledge I had.”

In response to Keith Olbermann’s claims in a March 2007 Rolling Stone interview in which he was quoted as saying, “Anybody who would embellish the story of their own fiancé’s murder should spend that hour a day not on television but in a psychiatrist’s chair,” Grace stated, “I did not put myself through law school and fight for all those years for victims of crime to waste one minute of my time, my energy, and my education in a war of words with Keith Olbermann, whom I’ve never met nor had any disagreement. I feel we have X amount of time on Earth, and that when we give in to our detractors or spend needless time on silly fights, I think that’s abusing the chance we have to do something good.”

Keith Griffin’s murderer, Tommy McCoy, was released from the Georgia Department of Corrections on December 5, 2006.

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Talk about loss of all credibility.

Message to Nancy: It’s over you old slut. Give it up. Take a good hard look in the mirror before pointing the finger and taking your frustrations out on Casey Anthony. You’re finished. Do the decent thing: Resign… go buy yourself a new wig, then start hooking in Vegas.

SJ
Founder: CaseyAnthonyFans.com

Article Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nancy_Grace

Comments

  1. Casey, I have a place for you to stay, safe. I have clothes for you. Shelter. Food. I wrote over 100 letters to you. Julie 859-285-2926 i love you girl

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